Z515 Spring 2015

Dialogue Trees: An Example of a Flowchart in Role Playing Games

I’ve always been a regular video gamer since I received a Nintendo Entertainment System (also known now as the original/regular Nintendo) back when I was 5 years old.  My favorite type of games were always role playing games (RPGs) because of the interesting stories told in them.  I recently watched a friend play Dragon Age: Inquisition (DAI) and, after reading about flowcharts, realized there were a lot of similarities between flowcharts and dialogue trees.  In DAI, whenever your character is talking with other characters, they are given multiple choices of what to say.  Each choice can change the attitudes of other characters toward you, give new dialogue options, and can progress or end the conversation.  This is a lot like a flowchart as you go from page to page, make choices on which way to go to reach your desired page destination, and sometimes you don’t reach the page you want to get to because of choosing the wrong options given to you.  But a major difference between dialogue trees and flowcharts is the resulting use.  Dialogue trees are written up to show the possible options in a game to find the different conversation results available to the player.  Flowcharts are written up to show how to get from point A to point B and can also be used to show how efficiently or inefficiently a user is able to complete that task.  Flowcharts can then be used as a guide to try to improve the user’s task by changing the flow for page to page on the website itself.

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This entry was written by kpeden2015 and published on March 30, 2015 at 1:30 pm. It’s filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

One thought on “Dialogue Trees: An Example of a Flowchart in Role Playing Games

  1. Pingback: Site Maps and Flow Charts | Z515 Spring 2015

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